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How to Still Pay Your Bills During a Layoff or When You Miss A Check

The post How to Still Pay Your Bills During a Layoff or When You Miss A Check appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

More than 800,000 Americans are currently affected by the government shut down. And, while it would make sense to force our congressmen and senators to also not get paid during that time, it just won’t happen.

survive a layoff

Even though you may not be working and getting a paycheck, it doesn’t mean the bills stop.  You still need to feed your family and take care of yourself.

The truth is that a layoff or furlough can happen to anyone at any time. And, if you already struggle to live paycheck to paycheck, not getting paid will certainly increase your stress level.

WHAT DO DO IF YOU MISS A PAYCHECK

First off, if you aren’t getting paid, you need to take a deep breath. I know it is stressful and you are struggling, but it is all going to be OK.

Your first instinct may be to go take out a second mortgage or unsecured loan.  You might be tempted to get some additional credit cards.  And, that retirement account may be calling your name.

Don’t do that.

All you are doing is adding more stress by increasing your debt or tax liability.  Then, when you do start having paychecks again, you end up with more bills to pay.

It may be a short term fix, with long-term consequences.  Just don’t do it.

Go ahead and have a good cry.  Then, wipe your tears and create a plan.

 

1. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A BUDGET

If you don’t have a budget, there is no time like the present to make one.  A budget is not going to restrict you from spending money.  In fact, it is the opposite.

Your budget shows you where you spend your money.  And, more importantly, where you might be able to cut back. It could mean stopping your gym membership and not dining out.  It could even mean canceling your cable service.

A traditional budget will show the income you bring in.  But, if you don’t have any regular paychecks, how do you do this?  You make your budget with the money you do have.

Don’t include the amount you normally make, but rather, just the amount currently coming in.  If there is no money at all, then create your budget with the money you have on hand.  You need to get everything out of every penny you make.

Your budget is crucial to surviving a layoff, furlough or government shut down.

 

2. COVER YOUR NEEDS

If you look at your budget, there are wants and needs.  A want is cable.  A need is housing.  When there is no money coming in (or less than usual), you must cover your needs.   This means making sure you pay for:

Housing
Food
Clothing
Transportation

Look at your budget and cover these expenses first.  Don’t pay your cable bill if you can’t put food on the table.  Cable is not important right now, but you must feed your family.

Once you cover your basic needs pay other bills in order of importance.  Don’t worry about the credit card bills right now – but pay your utilities.

You can’t pay everyone.  There is no getting around that.  Pay those you need to in order to protect your family.

 

3. SELL THINGS

A simple way to generate some quick cash is to find things you do not need and sell them.  The added bonus is that you get a chance to clean out the basement or the garage.

Use sites such as LetGo or Craigslist to sell big items.  If you have clothing check out ThredUp or Poshmark.  There is always someone who needs something.

 

4. STOP PAYING OFF DEBT

If you are in the midst of getting out of debt, you’ll have to stop — for now.  Getting out of debt can’t be your priority at this time.  You have to make sure you are taking care of your family.

Once your income returns to normal levels, you can pick up your debt snowball right where you left off.  And, if that means the balance had to increase in the short term, so be it.

 

5.  CUT BACK

When you struggle financially, it’s time for some big changes.  The first thing to do is look at your food bill.  See what you can cut from your spending.  Do some searches on Pinterest for very cheap family meals that you can make.

You may also want to check out different grocery stores.  For example, if you live near an ALDI, make a trip there to shop.  You’ll find almost everything you need, at very low prices.  You aren’t sacrificing quality.  You are just making the most of every dollar you spend.

Take a deep look at your budget and get rid of things such as monthly subscriptions like Hulu, gyms, etc.  You can always start these up again when you increase your income.  Once your income returns, you get to add these back in.  These are temporary cut backs just to help you survive this time.

 

6.  MAKE SOME CALLS

It is important to reach out to all of your providers and lenders to let them know you are part of the government shut down, or in the midst of a layoff.  You don’t want to risk getting service shut down due to lack of payment.

While many of them may not be able to make any concessions, they might be able to give you an additional month to pay or not charge a late fee.  But, you will never know unless you ask.  What’s the worst thing that will happen?

Note that during the winter months, utility companies are not allowed to discontinue services, but they can during other times of the year.

 

7. GET A SIDE HUSTLE OR TEMPORARY JOB

When there is no money coming in, you’ve got to find a way to change that.  It may be time to add a side-hustle. It could mean working fast food or getting a job at Walmart.  You just have to find a way to bring in money during this short period of time.

If your layoff or furlough is temporary, you may not be able to get another job. It could be part of the terms of your employment, so it is not an option.  That means you need to try a side-hustle.  It might mean you are an Uber driver or even tutor kids.

 

8.  ASK FOR HELP

Check your local food pantry or church to ask for help.  These organization can provide food and even money to help cover your bills.   You may also have family members who are willing to help by paying for your groceries or covering your electric bill.  But, you have to ask.

You have a family to provide for, so you can’t let your pride get in the way of getting them what they need.

 

WHAT DO WHEN YOU START GETTING PAID AGAIN

Once you are back at work and your income is back to what it was previously, don’t just go back to your spending like before.  You don’t want to struggle again should you find yourself in this same situation.

The most important thing to do is to work on building your emergency fund.  The idea is to build it up to have at least 3 – 6 months worth of living expenses covered.  I know it sounds like a lot.  And, it probably is.

You won’t build it up all at once.  It will take time.  But, you can do things such as sell more items or get a second job.  Even if you start saving just $10 a week, you’ll have saved more than $500 in a year.

surviving a layoff

The post How to Still Pay Your Bills During a Layoff or When You Miss A Check appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

How to Work from Home While Schooling Your Kids

Parents all over the United States have had to make lofty and quick adjustments due to the pandemic erupting the daily routines many of us haven’t had to change in quite a while. Feelings of overwhelm, exhaustion, and sheer confusion have consumed many; leaving the evergreen thoughts about how to best accommodate our children while simultaneously completing remote work effectively. If you have been struggling with finding a balance or could use some extra pointers to smooth out this process; see the tips below and breathe a little easier knowing there’s additional help available. 

Wake up at least an hour earlier 

I know, this is probably the last thing you wanted to hear fresh out of the gate. However, take this into consideration – you can use this uninterrupted time to knock out some tasks, enjoy your cup of coffee or breakfast before the day truly begins. Rushing (especially in the mornings) tends to set a precedence for the day, causing your mind and body to believe that a pace of hurriedness is expected; generating feelings of burnout very easily. Crankiness, low engagement, and minimal productivity doesn’t serve you, your work, or your children well. Use this solo time to still your thoughts so you are able to be fully present for all things the day holds. While this may take some time to get used to initially, you’ll thank yourself when you have the energy to handle any and everything! 

Set and abide by a clear routine 

Comparing your child’s school schedule in conjunction with your personal work obligations very clearly can showcase what needs to get done and when. Reviewing this every evening beforehand or once a week with your children creates new, positive habits that become easier to follow over time. Not only does this mimic physical in-school setting, but it also generates responsibility and a sense of accomplishment for your little ones. If necessary, communicate with your manager if there are time periods you need to be more present to assist your children with any assignments. 

Designate ‘do not disturb’ time periods 

Depending on your work demands, there are conference calls and online meetings that may have to happen while the kids are completing their individual assignments or classroom time. To make sure everyone fulfills their tasks with minimal interruptions, create time periods that are dedicated to completing the more complex tasks that require a more intense level of focus. To avoid any hiccups, give some leeway before the blocked time to address any questions or concerns. While this doesn’t guarantee that nothing else arises, it establishes peace of mind so that your thoughts can be directed to the tasks that lie ahead.    

Plan out all meals for the week

If meal prepping wasn’t your thing before, it definitely should be now. Having lunch and/or dinner already prepared not only saves you time (which is a necessity) but also helps to normalize the growing grocery bill that seems never-ending. Planning not only avoids confusion and lengthy food conversations, but it also sets a routine the entire family can abide by. Easy food items such as tacos, burrito bowls, sandwiches, and an assortment of fruit provide a healthy balance – while avoiding ordering fast food or takeout multiple times a week.  

Establish a ‘lessons learned’ list 

Similar to an end of year job evaluation, you and your family can take a personal inventory of the things that have worked effectively – while taking note of the things that didn’t. At the end of every week have a very candid conversation with your children. Ask them what worked for their schooling and also self-assess the positives during your remote work. Remember to keep an open mind! Instead of automatically responding with frustration, consider how much of an adjustment this is for kids. They’re accustomed to a multitude of settings and environments, which develops their reasoning and comprehension skills. If they identify something was less than satisfactory, ask what can be done (within reason) to improve their new learning environment. These notes can take place on sticky notes, a large whiteboard, or a simple notepad. This doesn’t have to be a serious sit-down conversation; it can almost be presented as a game. Keeping track of these items will help you all make tweaks as necessary while finding a solid sweet spot.  

Give yourself (and your children) grace 

Life as we knew it switched in the blink of an eye. The busyness of going into the office, dropping the kids off at school, and shuffling them to extracurricular activities stopped more abruptly than any of us could have imagined. As we all know but don’t like to admit, every day isn’t a good day. There are many nuances that happen throughout the course of time that can derail our plans, leaving us to feel defeated. But before going off to the deep end, remember this – every day serves as a chance to start over. If the food wasn’t prepared ahead of time it’s okay. If the workday didn’t go as smoothly as expected, it’s quite alright. Take a deep breath and remember we are all doing the best we can with what we currently have. Learning to navigate new waters such as this is only achieved through trial and error.   

Celebrate the small wins 

Let’s face it – this is new for all of us! While online learning and remote work have been in place for more than a few months, we have to grant ourselves grace. So, if you haven’t already – give yourself and your children a pat on the back! Plan safe outings you and your family can enjoy such as picnics, movie nights, or any outdoor activities. Getting some fresh air for at least 30 minutes during the day can help boost productivity and the moods of you and your children! Each week may not be easy, but it is rewarding to know that the effort you’ve put forth as a parent is a positive contribution to your family.   

One question that we all need to ask ourselves is-will we ever gain this amount of time with our families again? Let’s embrace this moment with learning and lasting memories.  

The post How to Work from Home While Schooling Your Kids appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com